Vintage Hand Tool Data

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Over the last few years since I started posting information regarding vintage hand planes and tools, I've faced up to the fact that I really like these old rusty bits of metal, and can comfortably say I'm a vintage tool collector. What started out as just picking up a few hand planes to help with specific projects has turned in to a search to acquire the complete selection of Stanley tools of a particular model or date range. Sure, I only need one No. 12 Try Square to get the job done, but I find I'll start digging through old catalogs to determine the features I like (in this case, the cross-hatched handle pattern rather than the stippled handles, the cast in hanging-hole, and the gun-black blades with white letters rather than the Nickel plated blades, for example), then attempt to procure all those tools over the course of a few months. With many of these vintage tools available for just a few dollars, collecting them turns out to be fairly inexpensive when compared to buying new, quality hand tools. Sometimes it can take quite a while to find the item I'm looking for, so to keep track of what I have and what I'm still trying to find I've created the listings below of vintage tool data.

If you've come to this page looking for hand plane restoration and tuning instructions, or the photo galleries of the tools I've collected, that information has all been moved because this page was growing unreasonably large. The hand plane reconditioning stuff is now on a dedicated Hand Planes page, and the original condition photos have been reorganized and moved to a new Vintage Tool Gallery page, both within the Et cetera section of the site. Hopefully that will allow easier navigation and faster page loads for all this vintage tool information. You may also click the image within the description for each type of tool below to go directly to the image gallery for those tools.

This page also has fairly complete list of good reading for folks interested in Stanley tools and vintage tools in general available in the Reference Materials section near the bottom of the page. The vintage tool data below is incomplete with regard to exact dates for each tool, but as I continue to research these old tools through various internet and print resources, I'll try to supply accurate information regarding tool "type" or date-of-manufacture.

 


Bailey Iron Bench Planes
Stanley bench planes, unless otherwise noted. Used for smoothing and surfacing of wood, and edge jointing preparation. First offered by Stanley in 1870 after their acquisition of the production license for Bailey's seven plane patents in 1869, the most important of which were the 8/31/1858 cammed lever cap and the Iron Bench Planes 8/6/1867 cutter adjustment, still manufactured today. Stanley retained Bailey's numbering system for iron bench planes No. 1 through No. 8, adding corrugated bottom availability for sizes No. 2 through No. 8 in 1898 (designated by the letter "C" in catalogs but not in the plane's casting). Later changes in model number include the addition of the wider No. 4½ in 1884 and 5½ in 1898, as well as an extra-heavy version of the No. 4½ and 5½ in 1902, designated by the letter "H" in the casting (but never offered in catalogs as such). The final addition to the line was in 1921, with the introduction of a smaller, lighter Jack plane No. 5¼. Type information is based on Roger K. Smith's Iron Bench Plane type study in Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Type  Notes
2      Smooth 7" L 1-5/8" W Type 8 ca.1899-1902 (ca.1933-1941 lever cap)
3      Smooth 8" L 1-3/4" W Type 13 ca.1925-1928
3      Smooth 8" L 1-3/4" W -- Fulton plane (rough user)
3C    Smooth 8" L 1-3/4" W Type 13 ca.1925-1928 (corrugated sole)
4      Smooth 9" L 2" W Type 16 ca.1933-1941
4      Smooth 9" L 2" W Type 16 ca.1933-1941 (Hock blade)
4      Smooth 9" L 2" W -- Hercules plane (rough user)
4C    Smooth 9" L 2" W Type 16 ca.1933-1941 (corrugated sole)
4½C Wide Smooth 10" L 2-3/8" W Type 16 ca.1933-1941 (corrugated sole)
5      Jack 14" L 2" W Type 12 ca.1919-1924
5C    Jack 14" L 2" W Type 14 ca.1929-1930 (corrugated sole)
5¼   Junior Jack 11-1/2" L 1-3/4" W Type 17 ca.1942-1945 (Aluminum tote)
5½C Wide Jack 15" L 2-3/8" W Type 16 ca.1933-1941 (corrugated sole)
6      Fore 18" L 2-3/8" W Type 10 ca.1907-1909
6C    Fore 18" L 2-3/8" W Type 19 ca.1948-1961 (corrugated sole)
7C    Jointer 22" L 2-3/8" W Type 14 ca.1929-1930 (corrugated sole)
8C    Jointer 24" L 2-5/8" W Type 13 ca.1925-1928 (corrugated sole)

Wood-Bottom "Transitional" Bench Planes
Wood-bottom Stanley bench planes offered as an option for users hesitant to make the change from the traditional wood-with-wedged-blade plane to the new Bailey patented blade adjustment mechanism, while maintaining the look and feel of the wooden plane (hence the term "transitional"). Transitional Planes Like their iron bench planes, Stanley first offered their wood-bottom bench planes in 1870 as a result of the 1869 production agreement with Leonard Bailey. Bailey had been manufacturing bench planes in Boston from 1858 until 1869 when he made the deal with Stanley, with both iron and wood-bottom models available. Bailey's original "transitional" models were numbered 1 through 14, which Stanley changed to 21 through 34 by adding the prefix 2 for size 1 through 9, and 3 for sizes 10 through 14 when they took over production. Stanley also added the No. 35 through No. 37 sizes with a rear handle and a modified, stepped-down casting to allow room for the adjustment mechanism. In 1898 Stanley made one addition to the "transitional" line with a wider version of the No. 27, designated as the No. 27½. Most "transitional" model production was ended by 1917 as iron bench planes took over sales, but a few popular models lasted until as late as 1943 before they were discontinued. Type information is based on Roger K. Smith's Wood Bottom Plane type study in Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Type  Notes
21      Smooth 7" L 1-3/4" W Type 12 ca.1905-1907
22      Smooth 8" L 1-3/4" W Type 5 ca.1884-1888
23      Smooth 9" L 1-3/4" W Type 12 ca.1905-1906
24      Smooth 8" L 2" W Type 9 ca.1888-1890
25      Block 9-1/2" L 1-3/4" W Type 10 ca.1893-1899, bevel-up 35° cutter
26      Jack 15" L 2" W Type 13 ca.1907-1919
27      Jack 15" L 2-1/8" W Type 14 ca.1912-1920
27½   Wide Jack 15" L 2-1/4" W Type 13 ca.1910-1912
28      Fore 18" L 2-3/8" W Type 15 ca.1920-1921
29      Fore 20" L 2-3/8" W Type 13 ca.1910-1912
30      Jointer 22" L 2-3/8" W Type 13 ca.1909
31      Jointer 24" L 2-3/8" W Type 13 ca.1909
32      Jointer 26" L 2-5/8" W Type 11 ca.1900-1904
33      Jointer 28" L 2-5/8" W Type 10 ca.1893-1899
34      Extra-long Jointer 30" L 2-5/8" W Type 8 ca.1886-1888
35      Smooth 9" L 2" W Type 14 ca.1912-1920, with razee tote
36      Wide Smooth 10" L 2-3/8" W Type 14 ca.1912-1920, with razee tote
37      "Jenny" Extra-wide Smooth 13" L 2-5/8" W Type 6 ca.1874-1884, with razee tote

"Liberty Bell" Bench Planes
In addition to the planes based on Bailey's patents, Stanley also offered their own line of planes based on Traut & Richards 1875 patented cutter adjustment and lever cap (which were much cheaper and simpler to produce Liberty Bell Planes than Bailey's design). Introduced in 1876 with a Liberty Bell inscribed with the number "76" in it cast on the lever cap to celebrate the nation's centennial, the "Liberty Bell" line remained in production until 1918. Five wood-bottom "Liberty Bell" models were produced in identical sizes to their Bailey patented counterparts, designated as models No. 122, 127, 129, 132, and the stepped-down handle 135 (as well as two iron models No. 104 and No. 105). Type information is based on John Walter's "Liberty Bell" type notes in Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Type  Notes
122      "Liberty Bell" Smooth 8" L 1-3/4" W Type 1 ca.1884-1886
127      "Liberty Bell" Jack 15" L 2-1/8" W Type 3 ca.1892-1906
129      "Liberty Bell" Fore 20" L 2-3/8" W Type 3 ca.1892-1906
132      "Liberty Bell" Jointer 26" L 2-5/8" W Type 3 ca.1892-1906
135      "Liberty Bell" Smooth 10" L 2-1/8" W Type 4 ca.1907-1909, with razee tote

"Handyman" Planes
Lesser quality Stanley planes marketed for occasional home use. I first became enamored with planes thanks to my father's H1204 Handyman plane, so despite many collectors frowning upon this line of Stanley planes, I've made some effort to collect all nine of the Handyman plane models. The Handyman line of tools was introduced around 1954, and continued into the 1970's with six plane models added to the line in 1957, and three more models added in 1964. The 1957 models were offered in identical sizes and used the same model numbers (preceded by "H") as Stanley's 1200 series "Defiance" planes that had been offered from the early 1930's through the early 1950's.
Handyman Planes I have yet to find any manner of type study relative to these planes, despite the many differences in color and logos over the years, so I'll make an attempt to categorize the finish differences. The earliest Handyman bench planes (Type 1 ) were offered with a finish similar to the Stanley "Victor" planes of the late 1930's and early 1940's: A grey enameled body & frog with polished sides, black enameled hardwood handles, and a silver enameled cap iron & lever cap. The lever cap has a red background "Handyman" logo, and the cap iron has a red enamel stripe along the bottom ½" or so ("Victor" planes always had red-stained hardwood handles and a red enameled frog & cap iron, however). The next finish change (Type 2 ), has a lever cap without the red stripe, and some models (Type 2a ) appear to have been offered without the red background logo as well. The next finish change (Type 3 ) appears to be the addition of a red enameled frog, and the lever cap logo was changed to "Stanley Handyman". These models still have the grey enameled body & frog, with the black enameled hardwood handles. I've also seen examples identical to the Type 3, with the only difference being a Nickel plated cap iron & lever cap, as well as Nickel handle hardware rather than Brass hardware (Type 3a ).
It appears that when Stanley introduced the three H100 series Handyman planes in 1964 with dark blue enameled bodies and handles, and red lever caps, they also changed the bench plane line to dark blue enameled bodies and handles (Type 4 ), rather than the earlier grey and black combination. The dark blue models also have a much simpler rear handle profile than earlier models, which had closely matched the handle of late Bailey bench planes. I've also seen these with Nickel plated cap irons & lever caps, so let's call those Type 4a, since they're identical to the Type 4 in all other respects. A late hardware change (Type 5 ) includes a stamped steel 2-piece adjustment fork (rather than the earlier 1-piece cast fork), 2 knurled ridges on the Brass adjuster wheel (earlier models all had 3 ridges), and the Brass handle hardware is replaced with Nickel plated hardware on all models. The Type 5 finish colors are identical to the Type 4. The final model (Type 6 ) has the same poor quality hardware as the Type 5, however the dark blue enamel is changed to a lighter blue-grey color slathered on the frog, body, and handles.
The Handyman H100 series were only offered with a single color combination as mentioned previously, while the H1200 block planes were offered in a variety of light and dark grey bodies and lever caps, with later models having red lever caps or a red cap tension wheel, depending on model. If I can find an assortment of the proper years of Stanley catalogs, I'll attempt to provide more accurate dates for the type changes I've outlined above.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Notes
H101P Block 3-1/2" L 1" W "Modern" style, no blade adjuster
H102   Block 6" L 1-1/4" W "Modern" style, no blade adjuster
H104   Smooth 9" L 2" W ca.1964, "Modern" style, no blade adjuster
H1203   Smooth 9" L 1-3/4" W Type 3, angled "Stanley Handyman" logo, black handles
H1204   Smooth 10" L 2" W Type 4a, angled "Stanley Handyman" logo, red frog, blue handles
H1205   Jack 14" L 2" W Type 6, angled "Stanley Handyman" logo, blue handles
H1247   Block 6-5/8" L 1-5/8" W wooden knob, grey cap, no blade adjuster
H1248   Block 5-1/2" L 1-5/16" W finger rest, grey cap, no blade adjuster
H1249   Block 7" L 1-5/8" W wooden knob, red cap, lever blade adjuster

Block Planes
Iron Stanley block planes, unless otherwise noted. Bevel-up planes used to plane small pieces of wood and the ends of trim or mouldings, etc. The numbering system for Stanley block planes can be quite confusing, so I've attempted to organize the block planes based on style and features, broken into five basic chronological categories. Following the description, the table lists the models I own in the proper category and notes the differences between the standard style plane and the features that warranted a new number. It's also important to remember that during the earliest years of a particular model's production, the basic model may not yet have all the features listed as standard (knobs, adjustable throat, lever caps, etc. were often changed during the first few years of a model).

The No. 9½ Fully Adjustable, Standard-angle Group
Introduced in 1872, under manufacturing contract of Leonard Bailey's design. The No. 9½ is 6 inches long, with a 1-5/8 inch wide bevel-up cutter bedded at 20°. It has an adjustable throat, a vertical screw cutter adjustment mechanism with a brass wheel (based on Bailey's 1867 patent), a pivot-lock lever cap, and a lateral 9½ series Block Planes adjuster. The finish consists of a Japanned lever cap and interior, with polished sides and sole. Recent models (since the mid-1960's) received a blue enamel finish, then later maroon enamel before returning to today's black enamel finish and No. 60 style end-wise adjuster. Models based on the No. 9½ include the 9¼, 9¾, 15, 15½, 16, and 17.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Date  Notes
9¼   Block 6" L 1-5/8" W ca.1947-1960 non-adjustable throat
9½   Block 6" L 1-5/8" W ca. 1960-1970 Type 24 (midnight blue), see above
9½   Block 6" L 1-5/8" W New 2006 see above
9¾   "Excelsior" Block 6" L 1-3/4" W ca.1886-1888 Type 7, w/ rear handle 
15      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1924-1935 1" longer than No. 9½
15½   "Excelsior" Block 7" L 1-3/4" W ca. 1888 Type 8A, 1" longer than No. 9½, w/ rear handle 
16      Block 6" L 1-5/8" W ca.1919-1929 Type 18, Nickel cap & trimmings
17      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca. 1936-1941 1" longer than No. 9½, w/ Nickel cap & trim

The No. 110 Slide-in Palm-cap Group
Introduced in 1874, designed by Stanley contractor Justus Traut. The very basic No. 110 is 7 inches long with a 1-3/4 inch wide bevel-up cutter bedded at 20°. It is a completely non-adjustable plane with a simple palm lever cap and wooden front knob. The plane and cap are Japanned inside and out with a polished sole, although Nickel 110 series Block Planes lever caps made a brief appearance after W.W.II. It is likely Stanley initially produced this plane as an inexpensive alternative (both to manufacture and purchase) to the Bailey designed 9½. Models based on the No. 110 include the 102, 103, 120, and 130.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Date  Notes
102      Block 5-1/2" L 1-5/16" W ca.1960-1962 smaller, cast finger rest (no knob)
103      Block 5-1/2" L 1-3/8" W ca.1919-1932 smaller, cast finger rest, lever blade adjuster
110      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1946-1958 Nickel lever cap
120      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1946-1950 lever blade adjuster
130      Double End Block 8" L 1-5/8" W ca.1909-1955 reversible blade for bullnose use

The No. 101 Finger-plane Group
Introduced in 1877, the small No. 101 marketed "for household use and light work" is 3-1/2 inches long with a 1 inch wide bevel-down cutter bedded at 40°. The lever cap is a slide-in style with a set screw, based on the style introduced the previous year on the "Liberty Bell" bench planes. The plane and cap is Japanned 101 series Block Planes inside and out with a polished sole and a Nickel plated lever cap screw. A red enamel lever cap became standard in 1940, and the body changed to grey enamel in 1951. This plane is likely a copy of Bailey's No. 50 "Little Victor" planes, which he introduced at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876 (but didn't offer for sale until 1880) as one of his new "Victor" planes after he left Stanley over a dispute regarding their production of Traut's cheap No. 110 reducing his 9½ royalties. Models based on the No. 101 include the 100, 100½, 101½ and 201.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Date  Notes
50      "Little Victor" Toy Block 3-1/4" L 1" W ca.1880-1884 screw blade adjuster (replica)
100      Small Block 3-1/2" L 1" W ca.1940-1958 "Squirrel-tail" cast rear handle
100½   Small "Model-maker's" Block 3-1/2" L 1" W ca.1936-1940 cast rear handle, double-curved bottom
101      Small Block 3-1/2" L 1" W ca.1940-1951 see above
201      Small Block 3-1/2" L 1" W ca.1900-1910 Nickel plated No. 101 (replica)

The No. 18 Knuckle Joint Group
Introduced in 1888, the No. 18 is the first block plane to employ the new knuckle joint lever cap, but is otherwise identical to the 9½ - 6 inches long, with a 1-5/8 inch wide bevel-up cutter bedded at 20°. It has an adjustable throat, and the same vertical screw and brass wheel cutter adjustment mechanism. The finish consists 18 series Block Planes of a Japanned interior, polished sides and sole, with a Nickel plated lever cap and trimmings (front knob, adjustment wheel, lateral lever, & throat adjuster). Models based on the No. 18 include the A18, S18, 18¼, and the 19. The low-angle No. 65 was also offered with a knuckle joint cap from 1911 to 1963. Type information is based on Jack Schoellhamer & Bob Kaune's type study in Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools (and John Walter's notes for the No. 65).

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Type  Notes
18      Block 6" L 1-5/8" W -- ca.1919-1924, see above
A18      Aluminum Block 6" L 1-5/8" W Type 13 ca.1930-1934, cast Aluminum body
S18      Steel Block 6" L 1-5/8" W Type 14 ca.1930-1935, pressed steel body
18¼   Block 6" L 1-5/8" W -- ca.1952-1958, non-adjustable throat
19      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W Type 13 ca.1920-1929, 1" longer than No. 18
65      Low-angle Block 7" L 1-5/8" W Type 3 ca.1947-1963, 12° cutter, knuckle-joint cap

The No. 60 End-wise Adjuster Group
Introduced in 1898, the No. 60 low-angle block plane is 6 inches long with a 1-3/8 inch wide bevel-up cutter bedded at 12°. It has an adjustable throat and because of the low angle of the cutter, a new end-wise 60 series Block Planes screw cutter adjustment mechanism is introduced. It has the same pivot-lock lever cap as the 9½. The finish consists of a Japanned interior, polished sides and sole, with a Nickel plated lever cap and trimmings. Models based on the No. 60 include the low-angle 60½, 61, 63, 65, 65½, and 118, as well as the standard-angle 131, 203, and 220.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Date  Notes
60      Low-angle Block 6" L 1-3/8" W ca.1933-1950 see above
60½   Low-angle Block 6" L 1-3/8" W ca.1960-1970 midnight blue cap & body
60½   Low-angle Block 6" L 1-3/8" W New 2006 (12-960), Japanned lever cap
61      Low-angle Block 6" L 1-3/8" W ca.1911-1934 Same as No. 60, non-adjustable throat, wood knob
65      Low-angle Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1964-1970 1" longer than No. 60, Nickel cap & trimmings
65½   Low-angle Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1947-1950 1" longer than No. 60, Japanned cap, Nickel trimmings
118      "Unbreakable" Block 6" L 1-5/8" W ca.1933-1941 pressed-steel body and cap
131      Double End Block 8" L 1-3/4" W ca.1922-1935 reversible blade for bullnose use, Japanned cap, wood knob
203      Block 5-1/2" L 1-3/8" W ca.1947-1962 25° cutter, non-adjustable throat, wood knob
220      Block 7" L 1-5/8" W ca.1947-1955 23° cutter, non-adjustable throat, wood knob

Specialty Planes
Stanley planes, unless otherwise noted. Specialty planes include circular planes, combination plow and moulding planes, router planes, and rabbet planes. When Stanley began production of Bailey's planes in 1870 the line included the No. 10 Carriage Maker's Rabbet plane, the No. 11 Belt Maker's plane, and a circular plane that Specialty Planes Stanley offered as the No. 13. Stanley immediately took on the market of wooden moulding planes when they secured the rights to produce Charles Miller's combination plane in 1870, which they offered in an 1871 catalog supplement as the "Miller's Patent Adjustable Metallic Plow, Filletster, Rabbet and Matching Plane" In addition to Miller's contract work, Stanley produced a dizzying array of specialty planes before the turn of the century based on the work Justus Traut. One of the most familiar is the No. 45 combination plane, as well as the No. 78 rabbet plane, which both appeared in 1884. Since there are hundreds of models of specialty planes that I know I'd never use, I've concentrated most of my collecting efforts on those models that I can actually use for trim carpentry or cabinet work as I try to maintain focus on user models of specialty planes. Dates listed below are based on cutter trademarks as well as type studies (for some models) available in Antique & Collectable Stanley Tools.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Notes
10      Carriage Maker's Rabbet 13" L 2-1/8" W New 2009, Anant plane
20      Circular 10" L 1-3/4" W ca.1936-1958
40      Scrub 9-1/2" L 1-1/4" W ca.1925-1932
45      Combination 11-1/2" L 20 Type 7, ca.1897-1902, complete w/ correct 1897 cutters
48      Tongue & Groove 10-1/2" L 5/16" W Type 1, ca.1876-1898, Japanned, Brass thumb-screws
50      Light Combination 9-1/4" L 17 Type 13, ca.1960s, complete w/ cutters, shaving deflector & small cutter screw
66      Hand Beader 11-1/2" L 8 ca.1892-1898, with replacement cutters & fences
71      Router 7-1/2" L 3 Type 13, ca.1945-1952, complete with 3 cutters & fence
71½   Router 7-1/2" L 1/2" W Type 5, ca.1925-1937, with Veritas cutters
75      Bull Nose Rabbet 4" L 1-1/16" W New 2007, (12-975)
78      Duplex, Rabbet & Filletster 8-1/4" L 1-1/2" W ca.1910-1925, no lateral adj., includes fence & depth stop
78      Duplex, Rabbet & Filletster 8-1/4" L 1-1/2" W ca.1950s, Craftsman plane, includes fence & depth stop
79      Side Rabbet 5-1/2" L 1/2" W New 2010, Kunz plane
90      Bull Nose Rabbet 4" L 1" W ca.1961-1969
92      Cabinet Maker's Rabbet 5-1/2" L 1" W ca.1925-1932
93      Cabinet Maker's Rabbet 6-1/2" L 1" W ca.1961-1969
94      Cabinet Maker's Rabbet 7-1/2" L 1-1/4" W ca.1910-1919
95      Edge-trimming Block 6" L 3/4" W ca.1924-1961
98      Side Rabbet (r.h.) 4" L 1/2" W ca.1909-1921
99      Side Rabbet (l.h.) 4" L 1/2" W ca.1936-1942
113      Circular 10" L 1-3/4" W Type 4, ca.1900-1906
171      Router w/ Fence 11" L 3/8", 5/8", 7/8" W ca.1914-1934
140      Rabbet & Block 7" L 1-3/4" W ca.1899-1918, skewed cutter & removable side
205      Steel Block 6-1/4" L 1-1/2" W ca.1927-1934, stamped Steel "Defiance" No. 1245
271      Router 3" L 1/4" W ca.1950-1973

"Premium" Planes
In June 2009, Stanley announced the introduction of five new Sweetheart™ premium hand planes with the statement "Our heritage in premium hand planes dates all the way back to 1870, which is why our company takes so seriously its place in hand tool history. We are certain that the new line of Stanley planes will once again capture the hearts of professional woodworkers, cabinet makers, and boat builders alike. Their Premium Planes mechanical precision, simple adjustment features, and top-quality grade materials are once again worthy of the famous Sweetheart logo... a distinction that professionals, collectors and tool enthusiasts all recognize as a coveted symbol of hand plane quality." Bottom line: Stanley decided to make an attempt to reclaim their place as the premiere hand plane maker from Veritas and Lie-Nielsen Toolworks - no small feat. I purchased their two bench plane models in 2010, and have found I use them more often then any of the other planes I currently own. Partly because I have only restored a handful of my collection to fully useable condition, but more importantly because I find the new Stanley planes are a joy to use, easy to adjust, and simply work very well. The Norris-style adjusters and adjustable mouths are wonderful, and the 1/8" thick A2 steel blades really hold an edge. At less than half the cost of comparable Veritas and Lie-Nielsen models, I'm very happy with the new Stanley planes, although many woodworkers seem less impressed with the new Stanley line and aren't giving up on the premium planes they already have from other makers. The five models are the 12-136 (No. 4), 12-137 (No. 62), 12-138 (No. 9½), 12-139 (No. 60½), and the 12-140 (No. 92).

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Type  Notes
12-136  "Premium" Smooth 10" L 2" W New 2010 No. 4, Norris adjuster, adjustable throat plate
12-137  "Premium" Low-Angle Jack 14" L 2" W New 2010 No. 62, Norris adjuster, adjustable throat plate
12-139  "Premium" Low-Angle Block 6-1/2" L 1-3/4" W New 2011 No. 60½, adjustable throat plate
12-140  "Premium" Shoulder & Chisel 7-3/4" L 3/4" W New 2011 No. 92, removable fore piece

Scrapers
Iron Stanley scrapers, unless otherwise noted. Used for scraping fine hardwood, veneers, and fancy grained wood. Other scrapers for general purpose use are listed here as well. Like the rest of Stanley's iron plane offerings, they entered the scraper market in 1870 when they offered Bailey's patented No. 12 veneer scraper. Scrapers Many of Stanley's veneer scraper offerings are highly valuable today (and far outside what I'm willing to spend), so like the specialty plane collection, I've concentrated only on those models I'll actually use. I find the No. 80 is perhaps the most used hand tool in my shop, since it excels at cleaning up milling and saw marks with just a few strokes. Wood handled scrapers are also quite useful for glue removal during cabinet assembly. Dates listed below are based on cutter trademarks or general production years.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Notes
12      Veneer Scraper 6-1/4" L 2-7/8" W ca.1925-1947
12½   Veneer Scraper 6-1/4" L 3" W ca.1900-1925, with Rosewood sole
70      Box Scraper 13" L 2" W ca.1934-1958, floating head, wood-handled scraper
80      Cabinet Scraper 11" L 2-3/4" W ca.1899-1942
80M    Cabinet Scraper 11" L 2-3/4" W ca.1930-1932, malleable Iron, date based on red box label
81      Cabinet Scraper 10" L 2-1/2" W ca.1909-1942, Nickle plated with Rosewood sole
82      Cabinet Scraper 14-1/2" L 3" W ca.1919-1924, single handle, adjustable-head scraper
83      Cabinet Scraper 9-1/2" L 4" W ca.1914-1924, adjustable roller guide
112      Cabinet Scraper Plane 9" L 2-7/8" W ca.1970s, Kunz plane
282      Single Handle Scraper 13" L 3" W ca.1935-1958, floor scraper
283      Adjustable Head Scraper 9-1/2" L 2-7/8" W ca.1929-1942, with top handle
292      Single Handle Scraper 12-1/2" L 2-1/2" W ca.1950-1964, reversible blade paint scraper

Spoke Shaves
Iron Stanley spoke shaves, unless otherwise noted. Used for planing flat or convex surfaces, especially useful in confined, restricted access areas. Many models also employ raised handles for clearance. Stanley iron spoke shaves originated with Leonard Bailey, of course, when Stanley began production of his work in Spoke Shaves 1870. Bailey originally had offered iron shave models numbered 1 through 12, which Stanley re-numbered as 51 through 62 in their 1870 catalog. The earliest models had Bailey's name stamped in the cutter, but by the 1880's Stanley trademarks began to appear on the blades. Model numbers in the casting and hanging holes appeared in the 1890's. By 1910 the line expanded to over 24 models, all of which had cast model numbers as well as textured surfaces on the handles. Stanley eventually produced 36 spoke shave models with both cast iron and wood bodies. By the end of W.W.II most models were discontinued, although the No. 64 and No. 151 are still produced by Stanley today. Dates listed are based on cutter trademarks and production years.

 No.  Style  Size  Cutter  Notes
51      Raised-Handle Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1911-1919
52      Straight-Handle Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1911-1919
53      Raised-Handle Adjustable Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1919-1924, adjustable throat
54      Straight-Handle Adjustable Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1919-1924, adjustable throat
55      Hollow-Face Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1922-1935
56      Cooper's Shave 18" L 2-5/8" W New 2011, Kunz shave
56½   Extra-wide Cooper's Shave 19" L 4" W ca.1872-1885, twin screw cap
57      Cooper's Shave 18" L 2-1/8" W ca.1870-1873, eye screw cap
58      Straight-Handle Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1901-1904, single screw cap
59      Straight-Handle Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1913-1917, twin screw cap
60      Double-Cutter Shave 10" L 1-1/2" W ca.1900-1920
62      Reversible Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1920-1921, twin facing cutters
63X    Round-Bottom Flat-Handle Shave 9" L 1-1/2" W ca.1924-1935, extra-light weight shave
63      Round-Bottom Flat-Handle Shave 9" L 1-3/4" W ca.1919-1924, light weight shave
64      Flat-Handle Shave 9" L 2-1/8" W ca.1919-1924, light weight shave
65      Chamfer Shave 10" L 1-1/2" W New 2010, Kunz shave, adjustable mouth width
67      Universal Shave 9-1/4" L 1-7/8" W ca.1922-1935, includes both bottoms & fence
68      Rabbet Shave 10-3/4" L 2-1/8" W ca.1919-1924
151      Raised-Handle Adjustable Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W Type 2, ca.1913-1919, adjustable cut depth
151M    Raised-Handle Adjustable Shave 10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1922-1935, malleable Iron, adjustable cut depth
152      Straight-Handle Adjustable Shave  10" L 2-1/8" W ca.1922-1935, adjustable cut depth

Miscellaneous Vintage Tools
Stanley tools, unless otherwise noted. This section includes a variety of hand tools purchased to meet a specific need, or just because the price was right and they're nifty. Also, after reading Schwarz' Misc. Stanley Tools The Anarchist's Tool Chest, I've gained a greater appreciation of how useful hand tools are in the shop, and how much can be accomlished with just a few tools. I have many more hand woodworking tools than what I'm listing here (clamps, chisels, etc.), however I try to purchase vintage tools whenever possible, so I'm continuing to keep track of what I have with this section. As this miscellaneous section grew rather rapidly, I broke out the information regarding Bit Braces, Hand Drills, and Bench Vises into separate sections below.

 No.  Name  Size  Date  Notes
1      Iron Try & Mitre Squares 6", 8" L ca.1950s gun black blades w/ white numbers, cast hanging hole
6      Stearns' Plane Gauge 14" L ca.1930s-1950s E.C. Stearns, similar to Stanley's No. 386
12      Iron Try Squares 6", 8", 10" & 12" L ca.1950s gun black blades w/ white numbers, cast hanging hole
15      Iron Try & Mitre Square 7-1/2" L ca.1898-1935 Nickel plated, handle end angled at 45°
16      Improved Iron Mitre Square 8" L ca.1909-1939 ungraduated, Nickel plated, blade set at 45°
18      "Eureka" Flush T Bevels 6", 8", 10" & 12" L ca.1960-1984 6", 10" & 12" Nickel plated, 8" Japanned black
21      Combination Try & Mitre Square 6", 9" & 12" L ca.1917-1924 adjustable, Nickel plated
28      Cornering Tool 5-1/2" L ca.1960-1969 1/16" & 1/8"
29      Cornering Tool 5-1/2" L ca.1960-1969 1/4" & 3/8"
36      Carpenter's Caliper Rule 6" ca.1900-1920 Boxwood two fold rule, Brass trim
41-017 Wing Dividers 7" ca.1960s w/ pencil clamp
60      Dowel Jig 1/4" - 3/4" ca.1911-1925 complete w/ 9 guides & box
62      Carpenter's Rule 24" ca.1920-1934 Boxwood four fold rule, Brass edge trim
85½   Panel Gauge 20-1/2" L ca.1870-1935 adjustable depth point, Rosewood w/ Brass shoe
97      Marking Gauge 6-1/2" L ca.1934-1958 roller cutter & point, 1 rod
98      Marking & Mortise Gauge 6-1/2" L ca.1934-1958 roller cutter & point, 2 rods
157      Bar Clamps 6" capacity ca.1964-1970s "Handyman" logo, red jaws
176      Scraper Blade Burnisher 8" L ca.1919-1932 3-1/2" blade
203      Bench Brackets 6" L ca.1920-1942 pair
305      Hollow Handle Tool Set 4-1/4" L ca.1911-1941 multipurpose tool with 12 tools stored in handle (brad & scratch awls, etc.)
404      Mitre Corner Clamp 6" capacity ca.1964-1970s blue enamel

Bit Braces & Hand Drills
Faced with finally building a proper woodworking bench in the Fall of 2014, I found a need for a good quality bit brace and a few auger bits. The selection of bit braces and hand drills Stanley offered throughout the early 20th century is quite impressive (nearly 40 types of hand & breast drills, and over 50 models of bit braces), yet I tried to stay focused on Stanley Braces obtaining tools I would actually use. While I've still got my father's Millers Falls No. 1410, 10" sweep brace from the 1960's, after studying many of my vintage Stanley catalogs I decided to get the 923 series of ratcheting braces since I think they finally got the ratchet and universal chuck system as good as it could get with those models in the early 1950's.
Of course, getting some vintage bit braces meant I also needed some augers and screwdriver bits... that led to the acquisition of a nice, boxed set of Russell Jennings fine-thread bits, as well as a set of Irwin course-thread, solid center bits. I also picked up a variety of driver bits, countersinks, hand drills, a breast drill, with all the details listed below.

 No.  Name  Size  Date  Notes
1      Stearns' Spoke Pointer 1-3/4" blade ca.1880-1940s E. C. Stearns, 1-7/8" capacity, with graduated adjustable shank
2      Stearns' Spoke Pointer 2-1/2" blade ca.1880-1940s E. C. Stearns, 2-5/8" capacity, with graduated adjustable shank
21      Irwin Micro-Dial Expansive Bit 5/8" - 1-3/4" ca.1930s includes box, 2 cutters & instructions
22      Irwin Micro-Dial Expansive Bit 7/8" - 3" ca.1930s includes box, 2 cutters & instructions
22      Dowel Sharpener 3" L ca.1950s square shank for brace, 3/4" dia. capacity
24      Countersink 4" L ca.1920-1933 square shank for brace, 7/8" dia., blued Steel, w/ depth gauge
26      Slotted Screwdriver Bits 5" L ca.1950s square shank for brace, 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", and 1/2" tips
32½   Russell Jennings No.100 Auger Bits 4 - 16 ca.1890-1944 "black-label", pre-Stanely, 13 pc. boxed set, 1/4" through 1" by 16ths
44      Bit & Square Level 2" Dia. ca.1934-1941 Laquered Brass, attaches to auger bit or square for accuracy
47      Bit Gauge 7" L ca.1953-1982 clamp-on, spring steel, auger bit depth stop
49      Adjustable Bit Gauge 2-1/2" L ca.1955-1965 Nickel finish w/ box
62T    Irwin Solid Center Auger Bits 4 - 16 ca.1950s boxed set of 6 bits, 1/4" through 1" by 8ths
62T    Irwin Solid Center Auger Bits 18,20,22,24 ca.1950s individual large bits, 1-1/8" through 1-1/2" by 8ths
103      Stearns' Hollow Auger Tenon Cutter 1/4" - 1-1/4" ca.1880-1940s E. C. Stearns, pivoted jaws with depth stop
139      Countersink 4" L ca.1950s square shank for brace, 3/4" dia.
261      Phillips Screwdriver Bit 4-1/2" L ca.1960s square shank for brace, #1 tip
262      Phillips Screwdriver Bit 4-1/2" L ca.1960s square shank for brace, #2 tip
600      Hand Drill Point Set 1/16" - 11/64" ca.1960s 8 piece set
610      "100 Plus" Hand Drill 12" L ca.1957 1/4" chuck, enclosed gear box, "Protected Jaw" spring chuck
611      "100 Plus" Hand Drill 12" L ca.1957 3/8" chuck, enclosed gear box, "Protected Jaw" spring chuck
617      Hand Drill 12" L ca.1950s 1/4" chuck, black 3-1/2" solid gear, "Protected Jaw" spring chuck
624      Hand Drill with Bits 13-3/4" L ca.1935-1946 3/8" chuck, orange 4" solid gear, "Protected Jaw" spring chuck
626      Hand Drill 13" L ca.1950s 3/8" chuck, black 4" solid gear, "Protected Jaw" spring chuck
743      Breast Drill 16" L ca.1950s 8" - 12" adj. sweep, orange 2 speed gear, "G" universal jaws
923      Ratchet Bit Braces 6", 8", 10", 12" & 14" sweeps ca.1939-1964, Cocobolo handles, box ratchet, "G" universal jaws
984      Short Corner Brace 7" H ca.1950s Cocobolo head & handle, concealed ratchet, "G" universal jaws
993      Corner Brace 9" sweep ca.1950s Cocobolo head & handle, enclosed gear case, "G" universal jaws

Stanley Vises
I was recently bitten by the "vise bug" - so I've started collecting a few specific years of small Stanley vises. Before WWII they produced a dizzying array of vises, so I've created this section to try and keep track of what I've got. Other larger machinist's bench vises are in the Shop Tools & Equipment Stanley Vises section of the Et cetera page.
Trying to nail down the production years of these vises is no picnic, believe me. Stanley bought the P.J. Leavens Co. of Vineland, New Jersey in 1911, and introduced two new lines of vises (the stationary base 650 series and clamp base 660 series) named Stanley "Jersey" and Victor "Jersey" to make use of the familiar Leavens' "Jersey" vise name. When Stanley made their big internal merger and introduced the Sweetheart logo in 1919, they also dropped the "Jersey" name and began casting the Stanely name in the side of their vises. They re-numbered the 650 series as 750's and the 660 series as 760's, and expanded their offering to include the clamp base 740 series (with simple cast iron jaws rather than the steel jaws of the 750's and 760's) as well as the swivel base 770 series. A few years later they also added the model number to the side of the vise, although I haven't determined when this change was made (I suspect it was in 1929, when they also changed the base clamp washer to a large oval from the previous small round washer). In 1929 they started to pare down the number of vises they offered, that being the last production year of the 750 and 770 series according to Walter (although those series were still listed in the 1934 catalog). They also introduced three new styles of vises in 1934 that were much cheaper to produce - the 707, 709, and 710. In 1939 they pared down the offerings more with the removal of the 1-3/4" and 2-1/4" widths from the 740 and 760 series to offer four widths for each series rather than six. The last change was made in 1950, with a change to the body casting to include a pair of indented lines in the side of the vise, and the finish changed to grey enamal with red lines. The 760 series steel jaws were also made removable in 1950. Production was finally stopped for the 740 and 760 series in 1964.
I'm mostly interested in getting the 740 series from the mid-1920s when there were six models. I've also gotten the three 1934 styles (707, 709 & 710) for the V6A vise display unit before they re-branded them to the "Defiance" line in 1942, which then became their "Handyman" 1200 series after the war.

 No.  Name  Size  Date  Notes
700      Woodworker's Vise 4-5/8" jaws ca.1950-1967 red & grey enamel
707      Clamp Base Vise 1-5/8" jaws ca.1934-1942 black & orange enamel, hardened Steel jaws
709      Clamp Base Vise 2-1/2" jaws ca.1934-1942 black & orange enamel, hardened Steel jaws
710      Clamp Base Swivel Vise 2-1/2" jaws ca.1934-1942 black & orange enamel, hardened Steel jaws
741      Clamp Base Vise 1-1/2" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
742      Clamp Base Vise 1-3/4" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
743      Clamp Base Vise 2" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
744      Clamp Base Vise 2-1/4" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
745      Clamp Base Vise 2-1/2" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
746      Clamp Base Vise 3" jaws ca.1925-1934 Japanned black, Iron jaws, cast model number
761      Clamp Base Vise 1-1/2" jaws ca.1929-1950 black & orange enamel, hardened Steel jaws, cast model number
772      Swivel Base Vise 1-3/4" jaws ca.1922-1924 Japanned black, hardened Steel jaws, no model number

 


Reference Materials

My titles relative to hand tools:

Stanley Tool Catalogs
While many of the reference materials below provide excellent information for popular collectable Stanley tools, most tools don't have an accepted type study available to determine appropriate manufacturing dates (like the Handyman planes, which I've made some attempt to "type" appropriately above). To get a better idea of how Stanley changed a tool over its production run, the well illustrated Stanley catalogs offer a reliable source of information to determine the age and rarity of their tools. The catalogs I own, both in digital format and hard copy, are listed here to ensure I don't acquire multiple copies of the same year catalog.

Stanley Catalog 34
1892 Stanley Rule & Level Company Improved Labor-Saving Carpenter's Tools  Catalog, (65 pg. digital copy)
1897 Stanley Rule & Level Company  Catalog, Abridgement, revised from 1892 (24 pg. digital copy)
1909 Stanley Carpenters & Mechanics Tools  Catalog No. 102, (127 pg. digital copy)
1911 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 110, (61 pg. hardcover reprint)
1914 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (144 pg.digital copy)
1920 Stanley Carpenters' & Mechanics' Tools  Catalog No. 120, w/ 1923 supplement (135 pg. hardcover reprint)
1925 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34 (August), (134 pg. digital copy)
1926 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34 (July), (192 pg. paperbound original)
1929 Stanley Tools for Carpenters and Mechanics  Catalog No. 129, (202 pg. digital copy)
1929 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34 (May '30), w/ 16 pg "New Tools" section (208 pg. paperbound reprint)
1934 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34 (April), w/ 25 pg "New Tools" section added to 1929 catalog (220 pg. digital copy)
1936 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34A (October), includes "Stanley-Atha" tools (239 pg. paperbound original)
1939 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 139, (254 pg. digital copy)
1942 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34 (September), (232 pg. paperbound original)
1947 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (200 pg. paperbound original)
1948 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (192 pg. paperbound original)
1950 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (192 pg. paperbound original)
1950 Stanley Tool Guide  Use and Care of Tools, (38 pg. paperbound original)
1950 Stanley Tool Dealer's Catalog  No. 150, (227 pg. hardcover original)
1953 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (212 pg. digital copy)
1953 Stanley Electric Tools  Catalog, (96 pg. digital copy)
1955 Do it Better with Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 55A, (48 pg. paperbound original)
1957 "Tools for Industry"  Catalog No. 60, (35 pg. paperbound original)
1958 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (224 pg. paperbound original)
1963 Stanley Tools  Dealer Catalog & Price Book (January), (52 pg. paperbound original)
1964 Stanley Tools  Catalog No. 34, (96 pg. paperbound original)
1971/72 Stanley Tools  Broad Line Catalog No. 34, (144 pg. paperbound original)
1973/74 Stanley Tools  Broad Line Catalog No. 34, (96 pg. paperbound original)
1975 Stanley Tools  Broad Line Catalog No. 34, (100 pg. paperbound original)

 

Stanley Tools

The Stanley Catalog Collection, 1855-1898:
Four Decades of Rules, Levels, Try-Squares, Planes, and Other Stanley Tools and Hardware
Publisher: Astragal Press
Pub. Date: 1989
ISBN: 0-961808-84-5
The Stanley Catalog Collection. Volume II:
A Supplemental Collection of 19th Century Stanley and Leonard Bailey Catalogs
Publisher: Astragal Press
Pub. Date: 1999
ISBN: 1-879335-78-6

 

Pocket Stanley Tools

The Stanley Little Big Books
A Comprehensive Price Guide for Planes  2006
A Comprehensive Price Guide for Rules, Levels & Other Stanley Tools  2007-2008
by Clarence Blanchard
Publisher: Antique & Collectable Tools, Inc.
Pub. Dates: 2006, 2007
ISBN-13: 978-0970541130, 978-0970541147


 

Stanley Tools



Antique & Collectible Stanley Tools: Guide to Identity & Value
by John Walter
Publisher: The Tool Merchant
Pub. Date: December, 1996
ISBN-13: 978-1878911018

Pocket Stanley Tools

Antique & Collectible Stanley Tools: 2000 Pocket Price Guide
by John Walter
Publisher: The Tool Merchant
Pub. Date: June 2000


 

Stanley Tools



The Stanley Plane: History & Descriptive Index
by Alvin Sellens
Publisher: Early American Industries Association
Pub. Date: June 1975 (3rd edition, 1980)
ISBN-13: 978-0961206802

Stanley Woodworking Tools: The Finest Years

Stanley Woodworking Tools: The Finest Years
by Walter H. Jacob
Publisher: Early American Industries Assn.
Pub. Date: October 2011
ISBN-13: 978-0943196008


 

The Handplane Book



The Handplane Book
by Garrett Hack
Publisher: Taunton Press
Pub. Date: September, 2003
ISBN-13: 978-1561587124

Restoring, Tuning & Using Classic Woodworking Tools

Restoring, Tuning & Using Classic Woodworking Tools
by Michael Dunbar
Publisher: Sterling Publishing
Pub. Date: December 1989
ISBN-13: 978-0806966700


 

Working with Handplanes



Working with Handplanes
by Fine Woodworking Editors (Editor)
Publisher: Taunton Press
Pub. Date: February, 2005
ISBN-13: 978-1561587483

Woodworker's Guide to Handplanes

Woodworker's Guide to Handplanes
by Scott Wynn
Publisher: Fox Chapel Publishing
Pub. Date: November, 2010
ISBN-13: 978-1565234536


 

Handplane Essentials



Handplane Essentials
by Christopher Schwarz (signed)
Publisher: Popular Woodworking Books
Pub. Date: August, 2010
ISBN-13: 978-1440302985

Hand Planes in the Modern Shop

Hand Planes in the Modern Shop
by Kerry Pierce
Publisher: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.
Pub. Date: February, 2011
ISBN-13: 978-0764335587


 

Handsaw Essentials



Handsaw Essentials
by Christopher Schwarz
Publisher: Betterway Books
Pub. Date: January, 2014
ISBN-13: 978-1440334337

Anarchist's Tool Chest

The Anarchist's Tool Chest
by Christopher Schwarz (signed)
Publisher: Lost Art Press
Pub. Date: 2010
ISBN-13: 978-0578084138



 

Virtuoso


Virtuoso - The Tool Cabinet and Workbench of Henry O. Studley
by Donald Williams, Narayan Nayar
Publisher: Lost Art Press
Pub. Date: May, 2015
ISBN-13: 978-0990623045

Woodwork Tools

Woodwork Tools  ca. 1922
by William Fairham
Publisher: Toolemera Press
Pub. Date: 2010
ISBN-13: 978-0982532997


 

The Art of Joinery


The Art of Joinery, Revised Edition  ca. 1678
by Joseph Moxon
Commentary: Christopher Schwarz (signed)
Publisher: Lost Art Press
Pub. Date: 2013
ISBN-13: 978-0985077778

Complete Guide to Sharpening

The Complete Guide to Sharpening
by Leonard Lee
Publisher: Taunton Press
Pub. Date: October, 1995
ISBN-13: 978-1561581252


 

The Perfect Edge


The Perfect Edge: The Ultimate Guide to Sharpening for Woodworkers
by Ron Hock (signed)
Publisher: Popular Woodworking Books
Pub. Date: January, 2010
ISBN-13: 978-1558708587